Alpine Goats

August 21, 2012 by  
Filed under Goat Breeds

American Dairy Goat Breed Description

The Alpine dairy goat is also referred to as the French Alpine and registration papers for this dairy goat use both designations and they are synonymous. The Alpine dairy goat is a medium to large size animal, alertly graceful, and the only breed with upright ears that offers all colors and combinations of colors giving them distinction and individuality. They are hardy, adaptable animals that thrive in any climate while maintaining good health and excellent production. The hair is medium to short. The face is straight. A Roman nose, Toggenburg color and markings, or all white is discriminated against. Alpine colors are described by using the following terms:

Items in ( ) indicate correct pronunciation
Cou Blanc
(coo blanc)
Literally “white neck” – white front quarters and black hindquarters with black or gray markings on the head.
Cou Clair
(coo clair)
Literally “clear neck” – front quarters are tan, saffron, off-white, or shading to gray with black hindquarters.
Cou Noir
(coo nwah)
Literally “black neck” – black front quarters and white hindquarters.
Sundgau
(sundgow)
Black with white markings such as underbody, facial stripes, etc.
Pied Spotted or mottled.
Chamoisee
(shamwahzay)
Brown or bay – characteristic markings are black face, dorsal stripe, feet and legs, ans sometimes a martingale running over the withers and down to the chest. Spelling for a male is chamoise.
Two-tone Chamoisee Light front quarters with brown or gray hindquarters. This is not a Cou Blanc or Coo Clair as these terms are reserved for animals with black hindquarters.
Broken Chamoisee A solid chamoisee broken with another color by being banded or splashed, etc.
Any variation in the above patterns broken with white should be described as a broken pattern such as broken cou blanc.

Breed Description

The sleek, short-haired, multicolored French Alpine tends to look larger, “rangier,” and fine boned with more space between the ground and the underline than other large dairy goats. Although the angularity and width should still be present, they may not be as obvious. The head may be as wide between the very alert eyes, but because it it longer, the width may not be as apparent. The “dish” in the bridge of the nose will be less severe, sometimes being almost straight. The muzzle may not appear to be as wide as deep, and the ears may be longer, although just as alert. Origin: France.
Alpine Does
Conformation and General Appearance: Large, rangy, fine-boned, angular, alert, graceful.
Height: 30″ or more at withers
Weight: 135 pounds or more
Head: Long, lean, clean-cut, dished angular, broad forehead; strong, tapered muzzle
Ears: Alert, erect, narrow, fine
Neck: Long, slender, feminine, no dewlap
Body: Long, angular, well-sprung ribs; deep and wide barrel; straight back, broad, long rump only slightly sloping; full and deep chest
Legs & Feet: Neat, clean, refined, long, slender, strong. Small, clean, true hooves (not splayed or turned inward or outward). Upright, strong, medium-length pasterns. Wide in hocks
Coat: Preferably short hair, close, glossy. Thin, pliable skin
Colors: Any color or combination. See above for variations.
Udder: Capacious, well-attached, even, pliable, soft, with well-formed, conical, well-deliniated teats.
Alpine Bucks
Conformation and General Appearance: Large, rangy, masculine but refined, vigorous
Height: 32″ or more at withers
Weight: 170 pounds or more
Head: Long, lean, angular, broad forehead; strong, tapered, firm muzzle; medium beard
Ears: Alert, erect, narrow, fine
Neck: Long, well-muscled and powerful, no dewlap
Body: Long, deep, well-sprung ribs; straight back; broad, long rump only slightly sloping; deep, broad chest
Legs & Feet: Long, straight, strong. Small, clean, true hooves (not splayed or turned inward or outward). Pasterns strong; Wide in hocks
Coat: Preferably short hair, close, glossy. Thin, pliable skin; longer spinal hair
Colors: Any color or combination. See above for variations.
Reproductive Organs: Well-developed, well-supported; two teats well-balanced and evenly spaced.

National Breed Club

Alpines International

Dave Battjes, Sec- Tres.
4217 12th Street
Wayland, MI 49348
battjesd@aol.com
Dues $10

 

The Alpines International club is active in promoting the accomplishments of the Alpine breed in both the milking parlor & the show ring. We offer members an informative brochure, bimonthly newsletter, advertising & doe photos on the Alpine page in the Dairy Goat Journal, participation in the All-American Program & Alpine Specialty shows, & publication of performance scores in the club newsletter.

 

Visit our Breeds & Breeding forum section and our milking section!

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